Five Old-Hollywood Starlets Who Endured Sexual Harassment Long Before ‘Weinstein Effect’ – Newsweek

Five Old-Hollywood Starlets Who Endured Sexual Harassment Long Before 'Weinstein Effect' - Newsweek Five Old-Hollywood Starlets Who Endured Sexual Harassment Long Before ‘Weinstein Effect’ – Newsweek

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 18:14:16 GMT

Hollywood is reckoning with its climate of sexual harassment and abuse like never before, a trend launched since a number of harassment and assault allegations against just two big shots, Harvey Weinstein and James Toback, climbed into the triple digits.and more »

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gary cooper

Franchot Tone

Stanislaus Pascal Franchot Tone was born in Niagara Falls, New York, the youngest son of Dr. Frank Jerome Tone, the wealthy president of the Carborundum Company, and his socially prominent wife, Gertrude Van Vrancken Franchot. His maternal great-grandfather was congressman Richard Franchot. Tone was also a distant relative of Wolfe Tone (the “father of Irish Republicanism”); his fourth great-grandfather John Tone was a first cousin of Peter Tone, the father of Wolfe Tone. Tone was of French Canadian, Irish, and English ancestry. Through his ancestor, the nobleman Gilbert BasqueHomme (Bascom), he was of French Basque descent.

Stanislaus Pascal Franchot Tone, known as Franchot Tone (February 27, 1905 – September 18, 1968), was an American stage, film , and television actor . He was the star of many successful film s and television series throughout his career, such as Bonanza, Wagon Train, The Twilight Zone, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer. He is perhaps best known for his Oscar nominated role as Midshipman Roger Byam in Mutiny on the Bounty (1935), starring alongside Clark Gable and Charles Laughton.

In 1935, Tone married actress Joan Crawford. They were divorced in 1939.[10] They made seven film s together–Today We Live (1933), Dancing Lady (1933), Sadie McKee (1934), No More Ladies (1935), The Gorgeous Hussy (1936), Love on the Run (1936), and The Bride Wore Red (1937). During the time they were married, they tried to have children, but Crawford alleged that seven pregnancies ended in miscarriages.

Tone took their split hard, and his recollections of her were cynical — “She’s like that old joke about Philadelphia: first prize, four years with Joan; second prize, eight.” However, many years later, when Tone was dying of lung cancer, Joan often cared for him, paying for his food and medical treatments. At one point during this period, Tone suggested they remarry. Crawford refused.

Tone, a chain smoker, died of lung cancer in New York City on September 18, 1968. Crawford arranged for him to be cremated and his ashes scattered at Muskoka Lakes, Canada.

Jean Arthur

Jean Arthur (October 17, 1900 – June 19, 1991) was an American actress and a major film star of the 1930s and 1940s .

Arthur had feature roles in three Frank Capra film s: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), You Can’t Take It With You (1938), and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), film s that championed the “everyday heroine”. Arthur was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1944 for her performance in The More the Merrier (1943). James Harvey wrote in his recounting of the era, “No one was more closely identified with the screwball comedy than Jean Arthur. So much was she part of it, so much was her star personality defined by it, that the screwball style itself seems almost unimaginable without her.” She has been called “the quintessential comedic leading lady”.

Her last film performance was the memorable, and distinctly non-comedic, homesteader’s wife in George Stevens’ Shane in 1953. To the public, Arthur was known as a reclusive woman. News magazine Life observed in a 1940 article: “Next to Garbo, Jean Arthur is Hollywood ’s reigning mystery woman.” As well as recoiling from interviews, she avoided photographers and refused to become a part of any kind of publicity.

Arthur died from heart failure June 19, 1991, at the age of 90.  No funeral service was held. She was cremated and her remains were scattered off the coast of Point Lobos, California.

Jean Arthur || The Actress Nobody Knew

I got the Jean Arthur biography by John Oller for Christmas. It’s a really good biography- very insightful. I highly recommend it. I never really cite my favorite …

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Natalie Wood

Natalie Wood (born Natalia Nikolaevna Zakharenko; July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981) was an American film and television actress . She was known for her screen roles in Miracle on 34th Street, Splendor in the Grass, Rebel Without a Cause, The Searchers, and West Side Story. She first worked in film s as a child, then became a successful Hollywood star as a young adult, when she received three Academy Award nominations before she was 25 years old.

Wood began acting in movies at the age of four and, at age eight was given a co-starring role with Maureen O’Hara in the classic Christmas film Miracle on 34th Street. As a teenager, her performance in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress . She starred in the musical film s West Side Story (1961) and Gypsy (1962), and received Academy Award for Best Actress nominations for her performances in Splendor in the Grass (1961) and Love with the Proper Stranger (1963). Her career continued with film s such as Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969).

During the making of the film Brainstorm, Wood drowned while on a weekend boat trip to Santa Catalina Island on board the Splendour. Many of the circumstances surrounding her drowning are unknown; it was never determined how she entered the water. She was with her husband Robert Wagner, Brainstorm co-star Christopher Walken, and the Splendour’s captain, Dennis Davern, on the evening of November 28, 1981. Wood’s body was recovered by authorities at 8:00 a.m. on November 29, one mile away from the boat, with a small inflatable dinghy, named the Valiant, found beached nearby. According to Wagner, when he went to bed, Wood was not there. The autopsy report revealed that Wood had bruises on her body and arms as well as an abrasion on her left cheek.

Later, in his memoir Pieces of My Heart, Wagner acknowledged that he had an argument with Wood before she disappeared. The autopsy found that Wood’s blood alcohol level was 0.14%, and there were traces of two types of medication in her bloodstream: a motion-sickness pill and a painkiller, both of which increase the effects of alcohol. Following his investigation, Los Angeles County coroner Thomas Noguchi ruled her death an accident by drowning and hypothermia. According to Noguchi, Wood had been drinking and may have slipped while trying to re-board the dinghy.

The Mystery of Natalie Wood, TV Movie 2004

 

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jane russell

Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell (June 21, 1921 – February 28, 2011)

was an American film actress and one of Hollywood ’s leading sex symbols in the 1940s and 1950s.

Russell moved from the Midwest to California, where she had her first film role in 1943 in The Outlaw. In 1947, Russell delved into music before returning to film s. After starring in multiple film s in the 1950s, Russell again returned to music while completing several other film s in the 1960s. She starred in more than 20 film s throughout her career.

Russell was born on June 21, 1921, in Bemidji, Minnesota. She was the eldest child and only daughter of the five children of Geraldine (née Jacobi; 1891 – 1986) and Roy William Russell (1890 – 1937). Her brothers are Thomas (b. 1924), Kenneth (b. 1925), Jamie (b. 1927), and Wallace (b. 1929).

In 1940, Russell was signed to a seven-year contract by film mogul Howard Hughes, and made her motion-picture debut in The Outlaw (1943), a story about Billy the Kid that went to great lengths to showcase her voluptuous figure. The movie was completed in 1941, but it was not released until 1943 in a limited release. Problems occurred with the censorship of the production code over the way her ample cleavage was displayed. When the movie was finally passed, it had a general release in 1946. During that time, she was kept busy doing publicity and became known nationally. Contrary to countless incorrect reports in the media since the release of The Outlaw, Russell did not wear the specially designed underwire bra that Howard Hughes had designed and made for her to wear during film ing. According to Jane’s 1985 autobiography, she said that the bra was so uncomfortable that she secretly discarded it and wore her own bra with the cups padded with tissue and the straps pulled up to elevate her breasts.

Russell’s measurements were 38D-24-36, and she stood 5 ft 7 in (97-61-91 cm and 1.7 m), making her more statuesque than most of her contemporaries. Her favorite co-star Bob Hope once introduced her as “the two and only Jane Russell”. He joked, “Culture is the ability to describe Jane Russell without moving your hands.” Howard Hughes said, “There are two good reasons why men go to see her. Those are enough.” A publicity still for the movie showed her lying on a pile of straw, her blouse stretched tight across her voluptuous breasts. Her right hand was behind her head of black hair and her left hand held a revolver. The image was a popular pin-up photo with servicemen during World War II. She did not appear in another movie until 1946, when she played Joan Kenwood in Young Widow for RKO.

Russell resided in the Santa Maria Valley along the Central Coast of California. She died at her home in Santa Maria of a respiratory-related illness on February 28, 2011. She is survived by three children: Thomas Waterfield, Tracy Foundas, and Robert Waterfield. Her funeral was held on March 12, 2011, at Pacific Christian Church, Santa Maria.

 

Ingrid Bergman interview – 1973

Ingrid Bergman interview – 1973

 

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Charles Bronson

Charles Bronson (born Charles Dennis Buchinsky; Lithuanian: Karolis Dionyzas Bučinskis; November 3, 1921 – August 30, 2003) was an American film and television actor .

He starred in film s such as Once Upon a Time in the West, The Magnificent Seven, The Dirty Dozen, The Great Escape, Rider on the Rain, The Mechanic, and the Death Wish series. He was often cast in the role of a police officer, gunfighter, or vigilante in revenge-oriented plot lines. He had long collaborations with film directors Michael Winner and J. Lee Thompson. In 1965, he was featured as Major Wolenski in Battle of the Bulge.

Bronson was born Charles Dennis Buchinsky, the 11th of 15 children, in a Roman Catholic family of Lithuanian descent in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania in the coal region of the Allegheny Mountains north of Johnstown, Pennsylvania.His father was a Lithuanian immigrant and his mother was an American of Lithuanian descent. They were of Lipka Tatar roots, which explains the “exotic” features of the actor , “as his cheekbones and eyes were often mistaken for Mexican or Native American but were in fact Lipka Tatar from Lithuania.”

After the end of World War II, Bronson worked at many odd jobs until joining a theatrical group in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He later shared an apartment in New York City with Jack Klugman while both were aspiring to play on the stage. In 1950, he married and moved to Hollywood , where he enrolled in acting classes and began to find small roles.

Bronson’s most famous role came when he was age 52, in Death Wish (Paramount, 1974), the most popular film of his long association with director Michael Winner. He played Paul Kersey, a successful New York architect who turns into a crime-fighting vigilante after his wife is murdered and his daughter sexually assaulted. This successful movie spawned various sequels over the next two decades, all starring Bronson.

Bronson’s health deteriorated in his later years, and he retired from acting after undergoing hip-replacement surgery in August 1998. Bronson died at age 81 on August 30, 2003 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

The epic Hollywood rivalry that made feud-watching fabulous: Bette Davis and Joan Crawford

Source: The epic Hollywood rivalry that made feud-watching fabulous: Bette Davis and Joan Crawford

Ava Gardner May Have Been a Heartbreaker, but She Met Her Match in Frank…