I enjoyed your comments on Jezebel. It is one of …

I enjoyed your comments on Jezebel. It is one of my favorite movies .

I am interested in your thoughts on the following: Do you thing that once Pres saw Julie in the white dress, he realized that he still loved her?

And in the garden when she kissed him, do you think the only reason he did not give into the kiss was because he was a man of hono?.

And when Julie told Amy who else would Pres love but his wife, do you think Julie believed that Pres really love her?
And do you think Amy believed Julie when she told her that Pres loves his wife?

No one has ever commented on the movie as you have and I would really be interested in your thoughts. Thanks

the great Lucille Ball

Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an American actress , comedienne, model, film -studio executive, and producer. She was best known as the star of the self-produced sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy–Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, Here’s Lucy, and Life with Lucy.

Ball’s career began in 1929 when she landed work as a model. Shortly thereafter, she began her performing career on Broadway using the stage names Diane Belmont and Dianne Belmont. She later appeared in several minor film roles in the 1930s and 1940s as a contract player for RKO Radio Pictures, being cast as a chorus girl or in similar roles. During this time, she met Cuban bandleader Desi Arnaz, and the two eloped in November 1940. In the 1950s, Ball ventured into television. In 1951, she and Arnaz created the sitcom I Love Lucy, a series that became one of the most beloved programs in television history. The same year, Ball gave birth to their first child, Lucie Arnaz, followed by Desi Arnaz, Jr. in 1953. Ball and Arnaz divorced in May 1960, and she married comedian Gary Morton in 1961.

In 1962, Ball became the first woman to run a major television studio, Desilu Productions, which produced many popular television series, including Mission: Impossible and Star Trek. Ball did not back away from acting completely, appearing in film and television roles for the rest of her career until her death in April 1989 from an abdominal aortic dissection at the age of 77.

Ball was nominated for 13 Primetime Emmy Awards, winning four times. In 1977, Ball was among the first recipients of the Women in Film Crystal Award. She was the recipient of the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award in 1979, inducted into the Television Hall of Fame in 1984, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Kennedy Center Honors in 1986, and the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 1989.

On April 18, 1989, Ball was at her home in Beverly Hills when she complained of chest pains. An ambulance was called and she was rushed to the emergency room of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. She was diagnosed with dissecting aortic aneurysm and underwent heart surgery for nearly eight hours, including the transplant of a new aorta. The surgery appeared to have been successful, and Ball began recovering very quickly, even walking around her room with little assistance. She received a flurry of get-well wishes from Hollywood , and across the street from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the Hard Rock Café erected a sign reading “Hard Rock Loves Lucy”. However, shortly after dawn on April 26, Ball awoke with severe back pains and soon lost consciousness.

Attempts to revive her proved unsuccessful and she died at 5:47 a.m. PDT. Doctors determined that Ball, who was 77 years old, had succumbed to a second aortic rupture, this time in the abdominal area, and that it was not directly related to her surgery the previous week. Her body was cremated and the ashes were originally interred in Forest Lawn – Hollywood Hills Cemetery in Los Angeles. However, in 2002, her children moved her remains to the Hunt family plot at Lake View Cemetery in Jamestown, New York, where her parents, Henry and Desirée (Hunt) Ball, his sister, Lucille Ball, and her grandparents are buried.

Finding Lucy | Lucille Ball Documentary (PBS)

From her struggling early days to her successful heyday, you’ll see the Lucy you love and meet the Lucy you never knew — the incredible woman behind the …

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Joan Fontaine

Joan Fontaine (born Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland; October 22, 1917 – December 15, 2013) was a British-American actress best known for her starring roles in Hollywood film s. Fontaine appeared in more than 45 feature film s in a career that spanned five decades. She was the younger sister of actress Olivia de Havilland.

Born in Tokyo to British parents, Fontaine moved to California with her mother, Lillian Fontaine, and sister, the actress Olivia de Havilland, following her parents’ divorce. She was anaemic as a child, and her childhood was consequently marred by poor health, but she had improved by her teen years. After living in Japan and attending school there for a short while, she began her stage career in 1935, signing a film contract with RKO Pictures. Fontaine received her first major role in The Man Who Found Himself (1937); however, she failed to make a significant impression and her contract was not renewed.

Her career prospects improved greatly after her starring role in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed Rebecca (1940), for which she received the first of what would be three nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actress ; the following year, she won for her role in Suspicion (1941). A third Oscar nomination came with the film The Constant Nymph. She appeared mostly in drama film s through the 1940s —including Letter from an Unknown Woman, which is now considered a classic . In the next decade, her career began to decline and she moved into stage and television roles. She appeared in fewer film s into the 1960s, her final feature film being The Witches (1966).

Married four times, she had one child by birth and one child by adoption, from whom she was later estranged. Her relationship with her sister was long known to be acrimonious, and included long periods of estrangement, especially in later life.

Fontaine and her sister, Olivia de Havilland, are the only set of siblings to have won lead acting Academy Awards. Olivia was the first to become an actress ; when Fontaine tried to follow her lead, their mother, who allegedly favored Olivia, refused to let Joan use the family name. Subsequently, Fontaine had to invent a name, taking first Joan Burfield, and later Joan Fontaine. Biographer Charles Higham records that the sisters had an uneasy relationship from early childhood, when Olivia would rip up the clothes Joan had to wear as hand-me-downs, forcing Joan to sew them back together. A large part of the friction between the sisters allegedly stemmed from Fontaine’s belief that Olivia was their mother’s favorite child.

On December 15, 2013, Fontaine died in her sleep of natural causes at the age of 96 in her Carmel Highlands home. Her longtime friend Noel Beutel said, “She had been fading in recent days and died peacefully.” Her Academy Award for Best Actress in Suspicion was initially going to be sold at an animal rights auction; however, the Academy threatened to sue since it was not offered back to them for $1. After Fontaine’s death , de Havilland released a statement saying she was “shocked and saddened” by the news. Fontaine was cremated.

Joan Fontaine (1917-2013)

Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (22nd October 1917 – 15th December 2013), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, was an English-American actress . Fontaine …

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Gail Russell

Gail Russell (September 21, 1924 – August 26, 1961) was an American film and television actress .

She was born Elizabeth L. Russell to George and Gladys (Barnet) Russell in Chicago, Illinois, and then moved to the Los Angeles, California, area when she was a teenager. Her father was initially a musician but later worked for Lockheed Corporation. Before she ventured into acting, she had planned to be a commercial artist.

Russell’s beauty brought her to the attention of Paramount Pictures in 1942, and she signed a long-term contract with that studio when she was  18 Although she was almost clinically shy and had no acting experience, Paramount had great expectations for her and employed an acting coach to work with her.

At the age of 19 she made her film debut in the 1943 film Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour. Russell appeared in several more film s in the early and mid-1940s , the most notable being The Uninvited (1944) with Ray Milland and Our Hearts Were Young and Gay (1944), in which she co-starred with Diana Lynn. Russell later appeared in the more popular film s Calcutta (1947) with Alan Ladd and the two with John Wayne, Angel and the Badman (1947) and Wake of the Red Witch (1948).

She continued working after 1947 and married actor Guy Madison in 1949; but by 1950 it was well known that she had become a victim of alcoholism, and Paramount did not renew her contract. She had started drinking on the set of The Uninvited to ease her paralyzing stage fright and lack of confidence. Alcohol made a shambles of her career, appearance and personal life. In January 1954, in a court in Santa Monica, California, Russell pleaded guilty to a charge of drunkenness, receiving a $150 fine. The fine was in lieu of a jail sentence, with the provision that she not use intoxicants or attend night spots for two years. In the same court session, she received a continuance on a charge of driving while drunk.

Mysteries and Scandals Gail Russell

Gail Russell Episode of Television Show Mysteries and Scandals.

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She appeared in two more film s after that but was not able to control her addiction, and on August 26, 1961, Russell was found dead in her apartment in Brentwood, Los Angeles, California, at the age of 36. She died from liver damage attributed to “acute and chronic alcoholism” with stomach contents aspiration as an additional cause. She was also found to have been suffering from malnutrition at the time of her death . She was buried in Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery in North Hollywood .

Joan Bennett

Joan Geraldine Bennett (February 27, 1910 – December 7, 1990) was an American stage, film and television actress . Besides acting on the stage, Bennett appeared in more than 70 motion pictures from the era of silent movies , well into the sound era. She is possibly best-remembered for her film noir femme fatale roles in director Fritz Lang’s movies such as The Woman in the Window (1944) and Scarlet Street (1945).

Bennett had three distinct phases to her long and successful career, first as a winsome blonde ingenue, then as a sensuous brunette femme fatale (with looks that movie magazines often compared to those of Hedy Lamarr), and finally as a warmhearted wife/mother figure.

In 1951, Bennett’s screen career was marred by scandal after her third husband, film producer Walter Wanger, shot and injured her agent Jennings Lang. Wanger suspected that Lang and Bennett were having an affair, a charge which she adamantly denied. Bennett married four times.

Bennett died of heart failure on the Friday evening of December 7, 1990, at age 80 from a heart attack at her home in Scarsdale, New York. She is interred in Pleasant View Cemetery, Lyme, Connecticut, with her parents.

Fay Wray

Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian/American actress most noted for playing the female lead in the 1933 film King Kong as Ann Darrow. Through an acting career that spanned 57 years, Wray attained international renown as an actress in horror movie roles. She was one of the first “scream queens”.

After appearing in minor movie roles, Wray gained media attention being selected as one of the “WAMPAS Baby Stars”. This led to her being contracted to Paramount Pictures as a teenager, where she made more than a dozen movies . After leaving Paramount, she signed deals with various film companies, being cast in her first horror film roles among many other types of roles, including in The Bowery (1933) and Viva Villa (1934), both huge productions starring Wallace Beery. For RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., she starred in the film with which she is most identified, King Kong (1933). After the success of King Kong, Wray made numerous appearances in both film and television before retiring in 1980.

Wray was born on a ranch near Cardston in the province of Alberta, Canada, to Mormon parents, Elvina Marguerite Jones, who was from Salt Lake City, Utah, and Joseph Heber Wray, who was from Kingston upon Hull, England. She was one of six children and was a granddaughter of Daniel Webster Jones. Wray was never a Mormon herself.

Wray married three times – to writers John Monk Saunders and Robert Riskin and the neurosurgeon Sanford Rothenberg (January 28, 1919 – January 4, 1991). She had three children: Susan Saunders, Victoria Riskin, and Robert Riskin, Jr.

She became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1933. In her autobiography On The Other Hand: A Life Story she declared herself a Republican.

In 2004, Wray was approached by director Peter Jackson to appear in a small cameo for the 2005 remake of King Kong. She met with Naomi Watts, who was to play the role of Ann Darrow. She politely declined the cameo, and claimed the original “Kong” to be the true “King”. Before film ing of the remake commenced, Wray died in her sleep of natural causes on August 8, 2004, in her Manhattan apartment, a month before her 97th birthday. Her friend Rick McKay said that “she just kind of drifted off quietly as if she was going to sleep… she just kind of gave out.”[16] Wray is interred at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood , California.

Two days after her death , the lights of the Empire State Building were extinguished for 15 minutes in her memory.

Fay Wray biography

A biography on film actress Fay Wray. Please comment!

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Fay Wray on Wogan

Fay Wray interviewed on UK tv show “Wogan”, this must have been around 1988.

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Ingrid Bergman

Ingrid Bergman (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈɪŋːrɪd ˈbærjman]; 29 August 1915 – 29 August 1982) was a Swedish actress who starred in a variety of European and American film s.she won three Academy Awards, two Emmy Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a BAFTA Award, and the Tony Award for Best Actress . She is best remembered for her roles as Ilsa Lund in Casablanca (1942) and as Alicia Huberman in Notorious (1946), an Alfred Hitchcock thriller starring Cary Grant and Claude Rains.

Bergman was born in Stockholm to a Swedish father and a German mother and started her career as an actress in Swedish and German film s in the 1930s . Her introduction to American audiences came with her starring role in the English-language remake of Intermezzo (1939). At her insistence, producer David O. Selznick agreed not to sign her to a contract – for four film s rather than the then-standard seven-year period, also at her insistence – until after Intermezzo had been released.

Selznick’s financial problems meant that Bergman was often loaned to other studios. Apart from Casablanca, her performances from this period include Victor Fleming’s remake of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), Gaslight (1944), and The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945). Her last film s for Selznick were Alfred Hitchcock’s Spellbound (1945) and Notorious (1946). Her final film for Hitchcock was Under Capricorn (1949).

Bergman was born on 29 August 1915 in Stockholm, to a Swedish father, Justus Samuel Bergman  May 1871 – 29 July 1929), and his German wife, Friedel Henrietta Augusta Louise (née Adler) Bergman (12 September 1884 – 19 January 1918), who was born in Kiel. Her parents married in Hamburg in 1907. She was named after Princess Ingrid of Sweden. She mainly grew up in Sweden, but spent the summers in Germany, and spoke fluent German.

Bergman died on 29 August 1982 at 12:00 AM, her 67th birthday in London, of breast cancer. Her body was cremated at Kensal Green Cemetery, London, and her ashes taken to Sweden. Most of them were scattered in the sea around the islet of Dannholmen off the fishing village of Fjällbacka in Bohuslän, on the west coast of Sweden, where she spent most of the summers from 1958 until her death in 1982. The rest were placed next to her parents’ ashes in Norra Begravningsplatsen (Northern Cemetery), Stockholm, Sweden.

Ingrid Bergman: A Passionate Life – A&E Biography (2002)

UNMONETISED video – no copyright infringement intended. Video Source: TV-recorded VHS Tape I had stashed away.

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The Life and Death of Dorothy Dandridge

Dorothy Jean Dandridge (November 9, 1922 – September 8, 1965) was an American film and theatre actress , singer, and dancer. She is perhaps best known for being the first African-American actress to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance in the 1954 film Carmen Jones. Dandridge performed as a vocalist in venues such as the Cotton Club and the Apollo Theater. During her early career, she performed as a part of The Wonder Children, later The Dandridge Sisters, and appeared in a succession of film s, usually in uncredited roles. In 1959 she was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Porgy and Bess. She is the subject of the 1999 HBO biographical film , Introducing Dorothy Dandridge. She has been recognized with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Dandridge was married and divorced twice, first to dancer Harold Nicholas (the father of her daughter, Harolyn Suzanne) and then to hotel owner Jack Denison. Dandridge died under mysterious circumstances at age 

Dorothy Dandridge was born on November 9, 1922 in Cleveland, Ohio to aspiring entertainer Ruby Dandridge (née Butler) (March 3, 1900 – October 17, 1987) and Cyril Dandridge (October 25, 1895 – July 9, 1989), a cabinetmaker and Baptist minister, who had separated just before her birth. Ruby created a song-and-dance act for her two young daughters, Vivian and Dorothy, under the name The Wonder Children, that was managed by Geneva Williams. The sisters toured the Southern United States almost nonstop for five years (rarely attending school), while Ruby worked and performed in Cleveland.

 

On September 8, 1965, Dandridge spoke by telephone with friend and former sister-in-law Geraldine “Geri” Branton. Dandridge was scheduled to fly to New York the next day to prepare for her nightclub engagement at Basin Street East. Branton told biographers that during the long conversation, Dandridge had veered from expressing hope for the future to singing Barbra Streisand’s “People” in its entirety to making this cryptic remark moments before hanging up on her: “Whatever happens, I know you will understand.” Several hours after her conversation with Branton ended, Dandridge was found dead and naked by her manager, Earl Mills. Two months later, a Los Angeles pathology institute determined the cause to be an accidental overdose of imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant. Yet the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office came to a different conclusion: “Miss Dandridge died of a rare embolism—blockage of the blood passages at the lungs and brain by tiny pieces of fat flaking off from bone marrow in a fractured right foot she sustained in a Hollywood gymnasium five days before she died.” She was 42 years old.

The Life and Death of Dorothy Dandridge

Dorohty Dandridge was the first black woman to be nominated for an Oscar after her role in Carmen Jones.Dorothy had problems with depression threw out her …

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Greer Garson

Eileen Evelyn Greer Garson, CBE (29 September 1904 – 6 April 1996) was a British-American actress who was very popular during the Second World War, being listed by the Motion Picture Herald as one of America’s top-ten box office draws from 1942-46.

A major star at MGM during the 1940s , Garson received seven Academy Award nominations, including a record five consecutive nominations, winning the Best Actress award for Mrs. Miniver (1942).

Greer Garson was born on 29 September 1904[2] in Manor Park, East Ham, then in Essex, now part of London, the only child of Nina (née Nancy Sophia Greer; died 1958) and George Garson (1865–1906 (41 years old?)), a commercial clerk in a London importing business. Her father was born in London, to Scottish parents, and her mother was from Drumalore (or Drumaloor), County Cavan. The name “Greer” is a contraction of “MacGregor”, another family name.

Her maternal grandfather was David Greer, an RIC sergeant in Castlewellan, County Down. In the 1880s he became a land steward to the Annesley family, wealthy landlords who built the town of Castlewellan. David Greer lived in a large detached house built on the lower part of what was known as Pig Street or known locally as the Back Way near Shilliday’s builder’s yard. The house was called “Claremount” and today the street is named Claremount Avenue. It was often reported erroneously that Greer Garson was born in this house.

Garson was educated at King’s College London, where she earned degrees in French and 18th-century literature, and in Grenoble.

Greer Garson’s early professional appearances were on stage, starting at Birmingham Repertory Theatre in January 1932. She appeared on television during its earliest years (the late 1930s ), most notably starring in a 30-minute production of an excerpt of Twelfth Night in May 1937, with Dorothy Black. These live transmissions were part of the BBC’s experimental service from Alexandra Palace, and this is the first known instance of a Shakespeare play performed on television.

In her final years, Garson occupied a penthouse suite at the Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.[citation needed] She died there from heart failure on 6 April 1996, at the age of 91. She is interred beside her late husband in the Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in Dallas.

 

Greer Garson

I always have the most difficult time when people ask me who my favourite actor /actress is because I just have so many, but if I really had to choose Greer would …

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Vintage Greer Garson Interview Circa 1985 TVO PART 1.

Great Elwy Yost interview with Greer Garson from TVO’s “Saturday Night at the Movies ” circa 1985.

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Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard (born Edith Holm Sondergaard; February 15, 1899 – August 14, 1985) was an American actress .

Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936. She was the first recipient of the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her film debut in Anthony Adverse (1936). She played supporting roles in various film s during the late 1930s and early 1940s , including The Cat and the Canary (1939), The Mark of Zorro (1940) and The Letter (1940). She was nominated for a second Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for Anna and the King of Siam (1946) but by the end of the decade her film appearances were fewer.

Married to the director Herbert Biberman, Sondergaard supported him when he was accused of communism and named as one of the Hollywood Ten in the early 1950s, which effectively ended her film career. She moved with Biberman to New York City and worked in theatre, and acted in film and television occasionally from the late 1960s. She moved back to Los Angeles where she died from cerebrovascular thrombosis.

Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard was an American actress born on February 15, 1899. Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936.

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