Joan Fontaine

Joan Fontaine (born Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland; October 22, 1917 – December 15, 2013) was a British-American actress best known for her starring roles in Hollywood film s. Fontaine appeared in more than 45 feature film s in a career that spanned five decades. She was the younger sister of actress Olivia de Havilland.

Born in Tokyo to British parents, Fontaine moved to California with her mother, Lillian Fontaine, and sister, the actress Olivia de Havilland, following her parents’ divorce. She was anaemic as a child, and her childhood was consequently marred by poor health, but she had improved by her teen years. After living in Japan and attending school there for a short while, she began her stage career in 1935, signing a film contract with RKO Pictures. Fontaine received her first major role in The Man Who Found Himself (1937); however, she failed to make a significant impression and her contract was not renewed.

Her career prospects improved greatly after her starring role in the Alfred Hitchcock-directed Rebecca (1940), for which she received the first of what would be three nominations for the Academy Award for Best Actress ; the following year, she won for her role in Suspicion (1941). A third Oscar nomination came with the film The Constant Nymph. She appeared mostly in drama film s through the 1940s —including Letter from an Unknown Woman, which is now considered a classic . In the next decade, her career began to decline and she moved into stage and television roles. She appeared in fewer film s into the 1960s, her final feature film being The Witches (1966).

Married four times, she had one child by birth and one child by adoption, from whom she was later estranged. Her relationship with her sister was long known to be acrimonious, and included long periods of estrangement, especially in later life.

Fontaine and her sister, Olivia de Havilland, are the only set of siblings to have won lead acting Academy Awards. Olivia was the first to become an actress ; when Fontaine tried to follow her lead, their mother, who allegedly favored Olivia, refused to let Joan use the family name. Subsequently, Fontaine had to invent a name, taking first Joan Burfield, and later Joan Fontaine. Biographer Charles Higham records that the sisters had an uneasy relationship from early childhood, when Olivia would rip up the clothes Joan had to wear as hand-me-downs, forcing Joan to sew them back together. A large part of the friction between the sisters allegedly stemmed from Fontaine’s belief that Olivia was their mother’s favorite child.

On December 15, 2013, Fontaine died in her sleep of natural causes at the age of 96 in her Carmel Highlands home. Her longtime friend Noel Beutel said, “She had been fading in recent days and died peacefully.” Her Academy Award for Best Actress in Suspicion was initially going to be sold at an animal rights auction; however, the Academy threatened to sue since it was not offered back to them for $1. After Fontaine’s death , de Havilland released a statement saying she was “shocked and saddened” by the news. Fontaine was cremated.

Joan Fontaine (1917-2013)

Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (22nd October 1917 – 15th December 2013), known professionally as Joan Fontaine, was an English-American actress . Fontaine …

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John Wayne the duke

Marion Mitchell Morrison (born Marion Robert Morrison; May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), known professionally as John Wayne and nicknamed Duke, was an American actor and film maker. An Academy Award-winner for True Grit (1969), Wayne was among the top box office draws for three decades.

Born in Winterset, Iowa, Wayne grew up in Southern California. He was president of Glendale High class of 1925. He found work at local film studios when he lost his football scholarship to the University of Southern California as a result of a bodysurfing accident. Initially working for the Fox Film Corporation, he appeared mostly in small bit parts. His first leading role came in Raoul Walsh’s The Big Trail (1930), which led to leading roles in numerous B movies throughout the 1930s , many of them in the Western genre.

Wayne’s career took off in 1939, with John Ford’s Stagecoach making him an instant star. He went on to star in 142 pictures. Biographer Ronald Davis said, “John Wayne personified for millions the nation’s frontier heritage. Eighty-three of his movies were Westerns, and in them he played cowboys, cavalrymen, and unconquerable loners extracted from the Republic’s central creation myth.”

Wayne was married three times and divorced twice. He was fluent in Spanish and his three wives, one of Spanish American descent and two of Hispanic descent, were Josephine Alicia Saenz, Esperanza Baur, and Pilar Pallete. He had four children with Josephine: Michael Wayne (November 23, 1934 – April 2, 2003), Mary Antonia “Toni” Wayne LaCava (February 25, 1936 – December 6, 2000), Patrick Wayne (born July 15, 1939), and Melinda Wayne Munoz (born December 3, 1940). He had three more children with Pilar: Aissa Wayne (born March 31, 1956), John Ethan Wayne (born February 22, 1962), and Marisa Wayne (born February 22, 1966).

Wayne had several high-profile affairs, including one with Marlene Dietrich that lasted for three years and one with Merle Oberon that lasted from 1938 to 1947. After his separation from his wife, Pilar, in 1973, Wayne became romantically involved and lived with his former secretary Pat Stacy (1941–1995) until his death in 1979. She published a biography of her life with him in 1983, titled Duke: A Love Story.

Best John Wayne Movie Quotes

John Wayne is an American icon. The Duke starred in more than 170 motion pictures in a career that spanned 50 years. This video features some of his most …

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Wayne’s hair began to thin in the 1940s , and he had begun to wear a hairpiece by the end of the decade. He was occasionally seen in public without the hairpiece (such as, according to Life magazine, at Gary Cooper’s funeral). During a widely noted appearance at Harvard University, Wayne was asked by a student “Is it true that your toupée is real mohair?” He responded: “Well sir, that’s real hair. Not mine, but real hair.”

Wayne biographer Michael Munn chronicled Wayne’s drinking habits.According to Sam O’Steen’s memoir, Cut to the Chase, studio directors knew to shoot Wayne’s scenes before noon, because by afternoon he “was a mean drunk”. He had been a chain smoker of cigarettes since young adulthood and was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1964. He underwent successful surgery to remove his entire left lung and four ribs. Despite efforts by his business associates to prevent him from going public with his illness for fear that it would cost him work, Wayne announced he had cancer and called on the public to get preventive examinations. Five years later, Wayne was declared cancer-free. Wayne has been credited with coining the term “The Big C” as a euphemism for cancer.

Wayne’s height has been perennially described as at least 6 ft 4 in (193 cm). He was a Freemason, a Master Mason in Marion McDaniel Lodge No. 56 F&AM, in Tucson, Arizona. He became a 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Mason and later joined the Al Malaikah Shrine Temple in Los Angeles. He became a member of the York Rite. During the early 1960s, John Wayne traveled extensively to Panama, during which he purchased the island of Taborcillo off the main coast. It was sold by his estate at his death .

Wayne died of stomach cancer at the age of 72 on June 11, 1979, at the UCLA Medical Center, and was buried in the Pacific View Memorial Park cemetery in Corona del Mar, Newport Beach. According to his son Patrick and his grandson Matthew Muñoz, a priest in the California Diocese of Orange, he converted to Roman Catholicism shortly before his death .He requested that his tombstone read “Feo, Fuerte y Formal”, a Spanish epitaph Wayne described as meaning “ugly, strong, and dignified”.The grave, which went unmarked for 20 years, is now marked with a quotation from his controversial 1971 Playboy interview: “Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

McLintock 1963 John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara – dir. Andrew V. McLaglen

Director: Andrew V. McLaglen Writer: James Edward Grant (original screenplay) Casts:John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Patrick Wayne |

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Joan Bennett

Joan Geraldine Bennett (February 27, 1910 – December 7, 1990) was an American stage, film and television actress . Besides acting on the stage, Bennett appeared in more than 70 motion pictures from the era of silent movies , well into the sound era. She is possibly best-remembered for her film noir femme fatale roles in director Fritz Lang’s movies such as The Woman in the Window (1944) and Scarlet Street (1945).

Bennett had three distinct phases to her long and successful career, first as a winsome blonde ingenue, then as a sensuous brunette femme fatale (with looks that movie magazines often compared to those of Hedy Lamarr), and finally as a warmhearted wife/mother figure.

In 1951, Bennett’s screen career was marred by scandal after her third husband, film producer Walter Wanger, shot and injured her agent Jennings Lang. Wanger suspected that Lang and Bennett were having an affair, a charge which she adamantly denied. Bennett married four times.

Bennett died of heart failure on the Friday evening of December 7, 1990, at age 80 from a heart attack at her home in Scarsdale, New York. She is interred in Pleasant View Cemetery, Lyme, Connecticut, with her parents.

Greer Garson

Eileen Evelyn Greer Garson, CBE (29 September 1904 – 6 April 1996) was a British-American actress who was very popular during the Second World War, being listed by the Motion Picture Herald as one of America’s top-ten box office draws from 1942-46.

A major star at MGM during the 1940s , Garson received seven Academy Award nominations, including a record five consecutive nominations, winning the Best Actress award for Mrs. Miniver (1942).

Greer Garson was born on 29 September 1904[2] in Manor Park, East Ham, then in Essex, now part of London, the only child of Nina (née Nancy Sophia Greer; died 1958) and George Garson (1865–1906 (41 years old?)), a commercial clerk in a London importing business. Her father was born in London, to Scottish parents, and her mother was from Drumalore (or Drumaloor), County Cavan. The name “Greer” is a contraction of “MacGregor”, another family name.

Her maternal grandfather was David Greer, an RIC sergeant in Castlewellan, County Down. In the 1880s he became a land steward to the Annesley family, wealthy landlords who built the town of Castlewellan. David Greer lived in a large detached house built on the lower part of what was known as Pig Street or known locally as the Back Way near Shilliday’s builder’s yard. The house was called “Claremount” and today the street is named Claremount Avenue. It was often reported erroneously that Greer Garson was born in this house.

Garson was educated at King’s College London, where she earned degrees in French and 18th-century literature, and in Grenoble.

Greer Garson’s early professional appearances were on stage, starting at Birmingham Repertory Theatre in January 1932. She appeared on television during its earliest years (the late 1930s ), most notably starring in a 30-minute production of an excerpt of Twelfth Night in May 1937, with Dorothy Black. These live transmissions were part of the BBC’s experimental service from Alexandra Palace, and this is the first known instance of a Shakespeare play performed on television.

In her final years, Garson occupied a penthouse suite at the Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.[citation needed] She died there from heart failure on 6 April 1996, at the age of 91. She is interred beside her late husband in the Sparkman-Hillcrest Memorial Park Cemetery in Dallas.

 

Greer Garson

I always have the most difficult time when people ask me who my favourite actor /actress is because I just have so many, but if I really had to choose Greer would …

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Vintage Greer Garson Interview Circa 1985 TVO PART 1.

Great Elwy Yost interview with Greer Garson from TVO’s “Saturday Night at the Movies ” circa 1985.

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Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard (born Edith Holm Sondergaard; February 15, 1899 – August 14, 1985) was an American actress .

Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936. She was the first recipient of the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her film debut in Anthony Adverse (1936). She played supporting roles in various film s during the late 1930s and early 1940s , including The Cat and the Canary (1939), The Mark of Zorro (1940) and The Letter (1940). She was nominated for a second Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for Anna and the King of Siam (1946) but by the end of the decade her film appearances were fewer.

Married to the director Herbert Biberman, Sondergaard supported him when he was accused of communism and named as one of the Hollywood Ten in the early 1950s, which effectively ended her film career. She moved with Biberman to New York City and worked in theatre, and acted in film and television occasionally from the late 1960s. She moved back to Los Angeles where she died from cerebrovascular thrombosis.

Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard was an American actress born on February 15, 1899. Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936.

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Linda Darnell

Linda Darnell (born Monetta Eloyse Darnell, October 16, 1923 – April 10, 1965) was an American film actress . Darnell progressed from modeling as a child to acting in theater and film as an adolescent. At the encouragement of her mother, she made her first film in 1939, and appeared in supporting roles in big-budget film s for 20th Century Fox throughout the 1940s . She rose to fame with co-starring roles opposite Tyrone Power in adventure film s, and established a main character career after her role in Forever Amber (1947). She won critical acclaim for her work in Unfaithfully Yours (1948) and A Letter to Three Wives (1949).

Since the beginning of her career at 20th Century Fox, Darnell had been very positive about her frequent co-star Tyrone Power. In a 1939 interview, she expressed her interest in starring opposite Power in Johnny Apollo (1940). Rationalizing why she was not cast, Darnell said: “It’s a man’s part and the girl’s role is only incidental.” Dorothy Lamour was cast, instead. Nevertheless, Darnell had her way as she was assigned to the female lead opposite Power in the light romantic comedy Day-Time Wife (1939). Although the film received only slightly favorable reviews, Darnell’s performance was received positively, with one critic saying: “Despite her apparent youth, [Darnell] turns in an outstanding performance when playing with popular players.” Another critic wrote that “little Linda is not only a breath-taking eyeful, but a splendid actress , as well.” Life magazine stated that Darnell appeared to be 22 and was “the most physically perfect girl in Hollywood ”. Following the film ’s release, she was cast in the drama comedy Star Dust in December 1939. The film was hailed as one of the “most original entertainment idea in years” and boosted Darnell’s popularity, being nicknamed ‘Hollywood ’s loveliest and most exciting star’. Variety continued: “Miss Darnell displays a wealth of youthful charm and personality that confirms studio efforts to build her to a draw personality.” Her studio contract had been revised to allow Darnell to earn $200 a week.

After appearing in several small film s, Darnell was cast in her first big-budget film in May 1940, appearing again opposite Tyrone Power in Brigham Young (1940), which was shot on location in mid-1940 and was regarded the most expensive film 20th Century Fox had yet produced. Darnell and Power were cast together for the second time due to the box office success of Day-Time Wife, and they became a highly publicized onscreen couple, which prompted Darryl F. Zanuck to add 18 more romantic scenes to Brigham Young.[ The film ’s director, Henry Hathaway, in later life had only slight memories of Darnell and recalled that “a sweeter girl never lived.” By June 1940, shortly after completing Brigham Young, Darnell achieved stardom and earned “a weekly salary larger than most bank officials.”

In the summer of 1940, Darnell began working on The Mark of Zorro (1940), in which she again co-starred as Power’s sweetheart in a role for which Anne Baxter was previously considered. A big-budget adventure film that was raved over by the critics, The Mark of Zorro was a box office sensation and did much to enhance Darnell’s star status. Afterwards, she was paired with Henry Fonda for the first time in the western Chad Hanna (1940), her first Technicolor film . The film received only little attention, unlike Darnell’s next film Blood and Sand (1941), which was shot on location in Mexico and in which she was reteamed with Power. It was the first film for which she was widely critically acclaimed. Nevertheless, Darnell later claimed that her downfall began after Blood and Sand. In an interview she said:

People got tired of seeing the sweet young things I was playing and I landed at the bottom of the roller coaster. The change and realization were very subtle. I’d had the fame and money every girl dreams about—and the romance. I’d crammed thirty years into ten, and while it was exciting and I would do it over again, I still know I missed out on my girlhood, the fun, little things that now seem important.

Darnell had been widely expected to win an Academy Award nomination for A Letter to Three Wives; when this did not happen, her career began to wane. She was cast opposite Richard Widmark and Veronica Lake in Slattery’s Hurricane (1949), which she perceived as a step down from the level she had reached with A Letter to Three Wives, though it did well at the box office.

Darnell died on April 10, 1965, from burns she received in a house fire in Glenview, Illinois early the day before. She had been staying at the home of her former secretary and former agent. She was trapped on the second floor of the home by heat and smoke, as the fire had started in the living room.

The women urged the young girl to jump from the second-floor window. After her daughter had jumped, Darnell’s secretary stood on the window ledge, calling for help. She had lost track of Darnell and insisted the firefighters rescue her before she was taken from the window ledge. Darnell was found next to the burning living room sofa; she was transferred to the burn unit at Chicago’s Cook County Hospital with burns to 80% of her body.

Linda Darnell – Documentary

 

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Humphrey Bogart

Humphrey DeForest Bogart (/ˈboʊɡɑːrt/;[1] December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an American screen and stage actor whose performances in 1940s film s noir such as The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, and The Big Sleep earned him status as a cultural icon.

 

Bogart began acting in 1921 after a hitch in the U.S. Navy in World War I and little success in various jobs in finance and the production side of the theater. Gradually he became a regular in Broadway shows in the 1920s and 1930s . When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film . His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest (1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with film s such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938).

Bogart’s breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941 with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon. The next year, his performance in Casablanca (1943; Oscar nomination) raised him to the peak of his profession and, at the same time, cemented his trademark film persona, that of the hard-boiled cynic who ultimately shows his noble side. Other successes followed, including To Have and Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946), Dark Passage (1947), and Key Largo (1948), all four with his wife Lauren Bacall; The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); In a Lonely Place (1950); The African Queen (1951; Oscar winner); Sabrina (1954); The Caine Mutiny (1954; Oscar nomination); and We’re No Angels (1955). His last film was The Harder They Fall (1956).

Bogart, a heavy smoker and drinker,  developed cancer of the esophagus. He almost never spoke of his failing health and refused to see a doctor until January 1956 after much persistence from Bacall. A diagnosis of cancer was made several weeks later. He underwent a surgical operation on March 1, 1956, where his entire esophagus, two lymph nodes, and a rib were removed but, by then, it was too late to halt the disease, even with chemotherapy. He underwent corrective surgery in November 1956 after the cancer had spread.With time, he grew too weak to walk up and down stairs, fighting the pain yet still able to joke: “Put me in the dumbwaiter and I’ll ride down to the first floor in style.” It was then altered to accommodate his wheelchair. Frank Sinatra was a frequent visitor, as were Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy. In an interview, Hepburn described the last time she and Tracy saw their dear friend, on the evening of January 13, 1957, the day before Bogart’s death :

Spence patted him on the shoulder and said, “Goodnight, Bogie.” Bogie turned his eyes to Spence very quietly and with a sweet smile covered Spence’s hand with his own and said, “Goodbye, Spence.” Spence’s heart stood still. He understood.

Bogart fell into a coma and died in his bed the next day. He had just turned 57 twenty days prior and weighed only 80 pounds (36 kg). His simple funeral was held at All Saints Episcopal Church, with musical selections from favorite composers Johann Sebastian Bach and Claude Debussy. The ceremony was attended by some of Hollywood ’s biggest stars, including Hepburn, Tracy, Judy Garland, David Niven, Ronald Reagan, James Mason, Bette Davis, Danny Kaye, Joan Fontaine, Marlene Dietrich, James Cagney, Errol Flynn, Gregory Peck, Gary Cooper, Billy Wilder, and Jack Warner. Bacall had asked Tracy to give the eulogy, but he was too upset, so John Huston spoke instead. He reminded the gathered mourners that while Bogart’s life had ended far too soon, it had been a rich one:

 

 


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Gary Cooper the hollywood great

Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper; May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was an American film actor known for his natural, authentic, and understated acting style and screen performances. His career spanned thirty-five years, from 1925 to 1960, and included leading roles in eighty-four feature film s. He was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classic al Hollywood . His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper’s ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural and authentic on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero

 

Gary Cooper
Cooper began his career as a film extra and stunt rider, but soon landed acting roles. After establishing himself as a Western hero in his early silent film s, Cooper became a movie star in 1929 with his first sound picture, The Virginian. In the early 1930s , he expanded his heroic image to include more cautious characters in adventure film s and dramas such as A Farewell to Arms (1932) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935). During the height of his career, Cooper portrayed a new type of hero—a champion of the common man—in film s such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943).
 
Cooper died quietly on  Saturday, May 13, 1961, at 12:47 pm, six days after his sixtieth birthday


BALL OF FIRE (1941) – BRAND NEW – ALL REGION – IMPORT – GARY COOPER | eBay

Myrna Loy

Myrna Loy (born Myrna Adele Williams; August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American film , television and stage actress .

Trained as a dancer, Loy devoted herself fully to an acting career following a few minor roles in silent film s. She was originally typecast in exotic roles, often as a vamp or a woman of Asian descent, but her career prospects improved greatly following her portrayal of Nora Charles in The Thin Man (1934).

Loy was born in Helena, Montana, the daughter of Adelle Mae (née Johnson) and rancher David Franklin Williams, and raised in Radersburg. She had a younger brother, David Williams (died 1982). Loy’s paternal grandparents were Welsh, and her maternal grandparents were Scottish and Swedish. Her first name was derived from a whistle stop near Broken Bow, Nebraska, whose name her father liked. Her father was also a banker and real estate developer and the youngest man ever elected to the Montana state legislature. Her mother studied music at the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago.

After the November 1918 death of Loy’s father from the 1918 flu pandemic, Loy’s mother permanently relocated the family to California, where they settled in Culver City. Loy attended the exclusive Westlake School for Girls in Los Angeles while continuing to study dance in downtown L.A.. When her teachers objected to her extracurricular participation in theatrical arts, her mother enrolled her in Venice High School, and at 15, she began appearing in local stage productions.

Loy died on December 14, 1993, at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan during unspecified surgery after a long illness. She was 88 years old. She had been frail and in failing health. She was cremated in New York and her ashes interred at Forestvale Cemetery in her native Helena, Montana.

Myrna Loy on The Dick Cavett Show (1980) pt 1 & 2

Myrna Loy on The Dick Cavett Show (1980)

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Ward Bond

Wardell Edwin Bond, known as Ward Bond (April 9, 1903 – November 5, 1960), was an American film character actor whose rugged appearance and easygoing charm were featured in more than two hundred film s and the NBC television series Wagon Train from 1957 to 1960. Among his best-remembered roles are Bert, the cop, in Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) and Captain Clayton in John Ford’s The Searchers (1956).

Bond was born in Benkelman in Dundy County, Nebraska. Benkelman is a small town located in the southwestern corner of the state near the Kansas and Colorado state lines. The Bond family, John W., Mabel L., and sister Bernice, lived in Benkelman until 1919 when they moved to Denver, Colorado, where Ward graduated from East High School.

Bond attended the University of Southern California and played football on the same team as future USC coach Jess Hill. At 6′ 2″ and 195 pounds, Bond was a starting lineman on USC’s first national championship team in 1928.

Bond and John Wayne, who as Marion Michael Morrison , had played tackle for USC in 1926 before an injury ended his career,became lifelong friends and colleagues. Bond, Wayne, and the entire Southern Cal team were hired to appear in Salute (1929), a football film starring George O’Brien and directed by John Ford. During the film ing of this movie, Bond and Wayne befriended Ford, and appeared in many of Ford’s later film s.

Bond made his screen debut in Salute and thereafter was a busy character actor , playing over 200 supporting roles. He appeared in 31 film s released in 1935 and 23 in 1939. Rarely playing the lead in theatrical film s, he starred in the television series Wagon Train from 1957 until his death in 1960. He was frequently typecast as a friendly policeman or as a brutal thug. He had a long-time working relationship with directors John Ford and Frank Capra, performing in such film s as The Searchers, Drums Along the Mohawk, The Quiet Man, and Fort Apache for Ford, with whom he made 25 film s, and It Happened One Night, It’s a Wonderful Life, and Riding High for Capra. Among his other well-known film s were Bringing Up Baby (1938), Gone with the Wind (1939), The Maltese Falcon (1941), Sergeant York (1941), They Were Expendable (1945), Joan of Arc (1948), in which he was atypically cast as Captain La Hire, Rio Bravo (1959), and Raoul Walsh’s 1930 widescreen wagon train epic The Big Trail, which also featured John Wayne’s first leading role.

Ward Bond in John Ford’s “The Searchers”

Reverend Captain Samuel Johnson Clayton, in the eye of multiple storms, sure am fond of those donuts.

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Bond died on November 5, 1960, from a massive heart attack; he was 57 at the time of his death . John Wayne gave the eulogy at his funeral. Bond’s will bequeathed to Wayne the shotgun with which Wayne had once accidentally shot Bond.