James Stewart

James Maitland “Jimmy” Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American actor and military officer who is among the most honored and popular stars in film history. A major Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer contract player, Stewart was known for his distinctive drawl and down-to-earth persona, which helped him often portray American middle-class men struggling in crisis. Many of the film s he starred in have become enduring classic s. Stewart was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one in competition for The Philadelphia Story (1940), and received an Academy Lifetime Achievement award in 1985. In 1999, Stewart was named the third-greatest male screen legend of the Golden Age of Hollywood by the American Film Institute, behind Humphrey Bogart and Cary Grant.The American Film Institute has also named five of Stewart’s film s to its list of the 100 best American film s ever made.

He also had a noted military career and was a World War II and Vietnam War veteran and pilot, who rose to the rank of Brigadier General in the United States Air Force Reserve, becoming the highest-ranking actor in military history.

Stewart was born on May 20, 1908, in Indiana, Pennsylvania, the son of Elizabeth Ruth (née Jackson; March 16, 1875 – August 2, 1953) and Alexander Maitland Stewart (May 19, 1871 – December 28, 1961), who owned a hardware store. Stewart was mainly of Scottish ancestry and was raised as a Presbyterian. He was descended from veterans of the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the American Civil War. The eldest of three children (he had two younger sisters, Virginia Wilson Stewart and Mary Kelly Stewart), young Jimmy was expected to one day inherit his father’s store and continue a business that had been in the family for three generations. His mother was an excellent pianist, but his father discouraged Stewart’s request for music lessons. When his father once accepted a gift of an accordion from a guest, Stewart quickly learned to play the instrument, which became a fixture offstage during his acting career. As the family grew, music continued to be an important part of family life.

A shy child, Stewart spent much of his after-school time in the basement working on model airplanes, mechanical drawing and chemistry—all with a dream of going into aviation. It was a dream greatly enhanced by the legendary 1927 flight of Charles Lindbergh, whose progress 19-year-old Stewart, then stricken with scarlet fever, was himself avidly following from home; thus foreshadowing his starring movie role as Lindbergh 30 years later.

In 1938 Stewart had a brief, tumultuous romance with Hollywood queen Norma Shearer, whose husband, Irving Thalberg, head of production at MGM, had died two years earlier. Stewart began a successful partnership with director Frank Capra in 1938, when he was loaned out to Columbia Pictures to star in You Can’t Take It With You. Capra had been impressed by Stewart’s minor role in Navy Blue and Gold (1937). The director had recently completed several well received film s, including It Happened One Night (1934), and was looking for the right actor to suit his needs—other recent actor s in Capra’s film s such as Clark Gable, Ronald Colman, and Gary Cooper did not quite fit. Not only was Stewart just what he was looking for, but Capra also found Stewart understood that prototype intuitively and required very little directing. Later Capra commented, “I think he’s probably the best actor who’s ever hit the screen.”

Stewart was hospitalized after falling in December 1995. In December 1996, he was due to have the battery in his pacemaker changed, but opted not to, preferring to let things happen naturally. In February 1997, he was hospitalized for an irregular heartbeat. On June 25, a thrombosis formed in his right leg, leading to a pulmonary embolism one week later. Surrounded by his children on July 2, 1997, Stewart died at the age of 89 at his home in Beverly Hills, California, with his final words to his family being, “I’m going to be with Gloria now.” President Bill Clinton commented that America had lost a “national treasure … a great actor , a gentleman and a patriot”. Over 3,000 mourners, mostly celebrities, attended Stewart’s memorial service, which included a firing of three volleys for his service in the Army Air Forces and the U.S. Air Force. Stewart’s remains are interred at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.

James Stewart – Interview w/ Michael Parkinson

Michael Parkinson interviews American actor Jimmy Stewart. He talks about his film s and working with Frank Capra and John Ford. Excerpt from “A wonderful …

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John Wayne the duke

Marion Mitchell Morrison (born Marion Robert Morrison; May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), known professionally as John Wayne and nicknamed Duke, was an American actor and film maker. An Academy Award-winner for True Grit (1969), Wayne was among the top box office draws for three decades.

Born in Winterset, Iowa, Wayne grew up in Southern California. He was president of Glendale High class of 1925. He found work at local film studios when he lost his football scholarship to the University of Southern California as a result of a bodysurfing accident. Initially working for the Fox Film Corporation, he appeared mostly in small bit parts. His first leading role came in Raoul Walsh’s The Big Trail (1930), which led to leading roles in numerous B movies throughout the 1930s , many of them in the Western genre.

Wayne’s career took off in 1939, with John Ford’s Stagecoach making him an instant star. He went on to star in 142 pictures. Biographer Ronald Davis said, “John Wayne personified for millions the nation’s frontier heritage. Eighty-three of his movies were Westerns, and in them he played cowboys, cavalrymen, and unconquerable loners extracted from the Republic’s central creation myth.”

Wayne was married three times and divorced twice. He was fluent in Spanish and his three wives, one of Spanish American descent and two of Hispanic descent, were Josephine Alicia Saenz, Esperanza Baur, and Pilar Pallete. He had four children with Josephine: Michael Wayne (November 23, 1934 – April 2, 2003), Mary Antonia “Toni” Wayne LaCava (February 25, 1936 – December 6, 2000), Patrick Wayne (born July 15, 1939), and Melinda Wayne Munoz (born December 3, 1940). He had three more children with Pilar: Aissa Wayne (born March 31, 1956), John Ethan Wayne (born February 22, 1962), and Marisa Wayne (born February 22, 1966).

Wayne had several high-profile affairs, including one with Marlene Dietrich that lasted for three years and one with Merle Oberon that lasted from 1938 to 1947. After his separation from his wife, Pilar, in 1973, Wayne became romantically involved and lived with his former secretary Pat Stacy (1941–1995) until his death in 1979. She published a biography of her life with him in 1983, titled Duke: A Love Story.

Best John Wayne Movie Quotes

John Wayne is an American icon. The Duke starred in more than 170 motion pictures in a career that spanned 50 years. This video features some of his most …

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Wayne’s hair began to thin in the 1940s , and he had begun to wear a hairpiece by the end of the decade. He was occasionally seen in public without the hairpiece (such as, according to Life magazine, at Gary Cooper’s funeral). During a widely noted appearance at Harvard University, Wayne was asked by a student “Is it true that your toupée is real mohair?” He responded: “Well sir, that’s real hair. Not mine, but real hair.”

Wayne biographer Michael Munn chronicled Wayne’s drinking habits.According to Sam O’Steen’s memoir, Cut to the Chase, studio directors knew to shoot Wayne’s scenes before noon, because by afternoon he “was a mean drunk”. He had been a chain smoker of cigarettes since young adulthood and was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1964. He underwent successful surgery to remove his entire left lung and four ribs. Despite efforts by his business associates to prevent him from going public with his illness for fear that it would cost him work, Wayne announced he had cancer and called on the public to get preventive examinations. Five years later, Wayne was declared cancer-free. Wayne has been credited with coining the term “The Big C” as a euphemism for cancer.

Wayne’s height has been perennially described as at least 6 ft 4 in (193 cm). He was a Freemason, a Master Mason in Marion McDaniel Lodge No. 56 F&AM, in Tucson, Arizona. He became a 32nd Degree Scottish Rite Mason and later joined the Al Malaikah Shrine Temple in Los Angeles. He became a member of the York Rite. During the early 1960s, John Wayne traveled extensively to Panama, during which he purchased the island of Taborcillo off the main coast. It was sold by his estate at his death .

Wayne died of stomach cancer at the age of 72 on June 11, 1979, at the UCLA Medical Center, and was buried in the Pacific View Memorial Park cemetery in Corona del Mar, Newport Beach. According to his son Patrick and his grandson Matthew Muñoz, a priest in the California Diocese of Orange, he converted to Roman Catholicism shortly before his death .He requested that his tombstone read “Feo, Fuerte y Formal”, a Spanish epitaph Wayne described as meaning “ugly, strong, and dignified”.The grave, which went unmarked for 20 years, is now marked with a quotation from his controversial 1971 Playboy interview: “Tomorrow is the most important thing in life. Comes into us at midnight very clean. It’s perfect when it arrives and it puts itself in our hands. It hopes we’ve learned something from yesterday.”

McLintock 1963 John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara – dir. Andrew V. McLaglen

Director: Andrew V. McLaglen Writer: James Edward Grant (original screenplay) Casts:John Wayne, Maureen O’Hara, Patrick Wayne |

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Joan Bennett

Joan Geraldine Bennett (February 27, 1910 – December 7, 1990) was an American stage, film and television actress . Besides acting on the stage, Bennett appeared in more than 70 motion pictures from the era of silent movies , well into the sound era. She is possibly best-remembered for her film noir femme fatale roles in director Fritz Lang’s movies such as The Woman in the Window (1944) and Scarlet Street (1945).

Bennett had three distinct phases to her long and successful career, first as a winsome blonde ingenue, then as a sensuous brunette femme fatale (with looks that movie magazines often compared to those of Hedy Lamarr), and finally as a warmhearted wife/mother figure.

In 1951, Bennett’s screen career was marred by scandal after her third husband, film producer Walter Wanger, shot and injured her agent Jennings Lang. Wanger suspected that Lang and Bennett were having an affair, a charge which she adamantly denied. Bennett married four times.

Bennett died of heart failure on the Friday evening of December 7, 1990, at age 80 from a heart attack at her home in Scarsdale, New York. She is interred in Pleasant View Cemetery, Lyme, Connecticut, with her parents.

Fay Wray

Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian/American actress most noted for playing the female lead in the 1933 film King Kong as Ann Darrow. Through an acting career that spanned 57 years, Wray attained international renown as an actress in horror movie roles. She was one of the first “scream queens”.

After appearing in minor movie roles, Wray gained media attention being selected as one of the “WAMPAS Baby Stars”. This led to her being contracted to Paramount Pictures as a teenager, where she made more than a dozen movies . After leaving Paramount, she signed deals with various film companies, being cast in her first horror film roles among many other types of roles, including in The Bowery (1933) and Viva Villa (1934), both huge productions starring Wallace Beery. For RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., she starred in the film with which she is most identified, King Kong (1933). After the success of King Kong, Wray made numerous appearances in both film and television before retiring in 1980.

Wray was born on a ranch near Cardston in the province of Alberta, Canada, to Mormon parents, Elvina Marguerite Jones, who was from Salt Lake City, Utah, and Joseph Heber Wray, who was from Kingston upon Hull, England. She was one of six children and was a granddaughter of Daniel Webster Jones. Wray was never a Mormon herself.

Wray married three times – to writers John Monk Saunders and Robert Riskin and the neurosurgeon Sanford Rothenberg (January 28, 1919 – January 4, 1991). She had three children: Susan Saunders, Victoria Riskin, and Robert Riskin, Jr.

She became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1933. In her autobiography On The Other Hand: A Life Story she declared herself a Republican.

In 2004, Wray was approached by director Peter Jackson to appear in a small cameo for the 2005 remake of King Kong. She met with Naomi Watts, who was to play the role of Ann Darrow. She politely declined the cameo, and claimed the original “Kong” to be the true “King”. Before film ing of the remake commenced, Wray died in her sleep of natural causes on August 8, 2004, in her Manhattan apartment, a month before her 97th birthday. Her friend Rick McKay said that “she just kind of drifted off quietly as if she was going to sleep… she just kind of gave out.”[16] Wray is interred at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery in Hollywood , California.

Two days after her death , the lights of the Empire State Building were extinguished for 15 minutes in her memory.

Fay Wray biography

A biography on film actress Fay Wray. Please comment!

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Fay Wray on Wogan

Fay Wray interviewed on UK tv show “Wogan”, this must have been around 1988.

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Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard (born Edith Holm Sondergaard; February 15, 1899 – August 14, 1985) was an American actress .

Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936. She was the first recipient of the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her film debut in Anthony Adverse (1936). She played supporting roles in various film s during the late 1930s and early 1940s , including The Cat and the Canary (1939), The Mark of Zorro (1940) and The Letter (1940). She was nominated for a second Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for Anna and the King of Siam (1946) but by the end of the decade her film appearances were fewer.

Married to the director Herbert Biberman, Sondergaard supported him when he was accused of communism and named as one of the Hollywood Ten in the early 1950s, which effectively ended her film career. She moved with Biberman to New York City and worked in theatre, and acted in film and television occasionally from the late 1960s. She moved back to Los Angeles where she died from cerebrovascular thrombosis.

Gale Sondergaard

Gale Sondergaard was an American actress born on February 15, 1899. Sondergaard began her acting career in theater, and progressed to film s in 1936.

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Maria Riva Talks About Marlene Dietrich’ Abuse

 

Maria Riva Talks About Marlene Dietrich’ Abuse

 

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Jean Harlow hollywood great

Jean Harlow (born Harlean Harlow Carpenter; March 3, 1911 – June 7, 1937) was an American film actress and sex symbol of the 1930s .

Harlow was signed by director Howard Hughes, and her first major appearance was in Hell’s Angels (1930), followed by a series of critically unsuccessful film s before she signed with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1932. Harlow became a leading lady for MGM, starring in a string of hit film s including Red Dust (1932), Dinner at Eight (1933), Reckless (1935), and Suzy (1936). Harlow’s popularity rivaled and soon surpassed that of her MGM colleagues Joan Crawford and Norma Shearer. She had become one of the biggest movie stars in the world by the late 1930s , often nicknamed the “Blond Bombshell” and the “Platinum Blonde”; she was also popular for her “Laughing Vamp” movie persona.

Harlow died at age 26 during the 1937 film ing of Saratoga. The film was completed using body doubles and released a little over a month after Harlow’s death . The American Film Institute ranked her as the 22nd greatest female star of classic Hollywood cinema.

THE DEATH OF JEAN HARLOW

This video details the death of actress Jean Harlow!

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Thelma Todd

Thelma Alice Todd[1] (July 29, 1906 – December 16, 1935) was an American actress . Appearing in about 120 pictures between 1926 and 1935, she is best remembered for her comedic roles in film s such as Marx Brothers’ Monkey Business and Horse Feathers, a number of Charley Chase’s short comedies, and co-starring with Buster Keaton and Jimmy Durante in Speak Easily. She also had roles in Wheeler and Woolsey farces, several Laurel and Hardy film s, the last of which (The Bohemian Girl) featured her in a part that was truncated by her suspicious death at the age of 29.

Todd was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts to John Shaw Todd, an upholsterer from Ireland, and Alice Elizabeth Edwards, an immigrant from Canada and was a bright student who achieved good academic results. She intended to become a school teacher and enrolled at the Lowell Normal School (now University of Massachusetts, Lowell) after graduating from high school in 1923. However, in her late teens, she began entering beauty pageants, winning the title of Miss Massachusetts in 1925. While representing her home state, she was spotted by a Hollywood talent scout and began her career in film at Paramount. She had an older brother, William.

During the silent film era, Todd appeared in numerous supporting roles that made full use of her beauty but gave her little chance to act. With the advent of the talkies, Todd was given opportunity to expand her roles when producer Hal Roach signed her to appear with such comedy stars as Harry Langdon, Charley Chase, and Laurel and Hardy.

On the morning of December 16, 1935, Thelma Todd was found dead in her car inside the garage of Jewel Carmen, a former actress and former wife of Todd’s lover and business partner, Roland West. Carmen’s house was approximately a block from the topmost side of Todd’s restaurant. Her death was determined to have been caused by carbon monoxide poisoning. West is quoted in a contemporaneous newspaper account as having locked her out, which may have caused her to seek refuge and warmth in the car. Todd had a wide circle of friends and associates as well as a busy social life.

Pre-Codes: Thelma Todd

A tribute to the great Thelma Todd. Check out my other pre-Code videos. Pre-Codes: The Unmentionable https://youtu.be/R3-XCvlTkK4 Pre-Codes: Bare …

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THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF THELMA TODD

OPEN ME!!! A beautiful actress whose life was cut short and the clues surrounding her death left the world with more questions than answers. Today we talk …

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Gary Cooper the hollywood great

Gary Cooper (born Frank James Cooper; May 7, 1901 – May 13, 1961) was an American film actor known for his natural, authentic, and understated acting style and screen performances. His career spanned thirty-five years, from 1925 to 1960, and included leading roles in eighty-four feature film s. He was a major movie star from the end of the silent film era through the end of the golden age of Classic al Hollywood . His screen persona appealed strongly to both men and women, and his range of performances included roles in most major movie genres. Cooper’s ability to project his own personality onto the characters he played contributed to his appearing natural and authentic on screen. The screen persona he sustained throughout his career represented the ideal American hero

 

Gary Cooper
Cooper began his career as a film extra and stunt rider, but soon landed acting roles. After establishing himself as a Western hero in his early silent film s, Cooper became a movie star in 1929 with his first sound picture, The Virginian. In the early 1930s , he expanded his heroic image to include more cautious characters in adventure film s and dramas such as A Farewell to Arms (1932) and The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935). During the height of his career, Cooper portrayed a new type of hero—a champion of the common man—in film s such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), Meet John Doe (1941), Sergeant York (1941), The Pride of the Yankees (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943).
 
Cooper died quietly on  Saturday, May 13, 1961, at 12:47 pm, six days after his sixtieth birthday


BALL OF FIRE (1941) – BRAND NEW – ALL REGION – IMPORT – GARY COOPER | eBay

Ward Bond

Wardell Edwin Bond, known as Ward Bond (April 9, 1903 – November 5, 1960), was an American film character actor whose rugged appearance and easygoing charm were featured in more than two hundred film s and the NBC television series Wagon Train from 1957 to 1960. Among his best-remembered roles are Bert, the cop, in Frank Capra’s It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) and Captain Clayton in John Ford’s The Searchers (1956).

Bond was born in Benkelman in Dundy County, Nebraska. Benkelman is a small town located in the southwestern corner of the state near the Kansas and Colorado state lines. The Bond family, John W., Mabel L., and sister Bernice, lived in Benkelman until 1919 when they moved to Denver, Colorado, where Ward graduated from East High School.

Bond attended the University of Southern California and played football on the same team as future USC coach Jess Hill. At 6′ 2″ and 195 pounds, Bond was a starting lineman on USC’s first national championship team in 1928.

Bond and John Wayne, who as Marion Michael Morrison , had played tackle for USC in 1926 before an injury ended his career,became lifelong friends and colleagues. Bond, Wayne, and the entire Southern Cal team were hired to appear in Salute (1929), a football film starring George O’Brien and directed by John Ford. During the film ing of this movie, Bond and Wayne befriended Ford, and appeared in many of Ford’s later film s.

Bond made his screen debut in Salute and thereafter was a busy character actor , playing over 200 supporting roles. He appeared in 31 film s released in 1935 and 23 in 1939. Rarely playing the lead in theatrical film s, he starred in the television series Wagon Train from 1957 until his death in 1960. He was frequently typecast as a friendly policeman or as a brutal thug. He had a long-time working relationship with directors John Ford and Frank Capra, performing in such film s as The Searchers, Drums Along the Mohawk, The Quiet Man, and Fort Apache for Ford, with whom he made 25 film s, and It Happened One Night, It’s a Wonderful Life, and Riding High for Capra. Among his other well-known film s were Bringing Up Baby (1938), Gone with the Wind (1939), The Maltese Falcon (1941), Sergeant York (1941), They Were Expendable (1945), Joan of Arc (1948), in which he was atypically cast as Captain La Hire, Rio Bravo (1959), and Raoul Walsh’s 1930 widescreen wagon train epic The Big Trail, which also featured John Wayne’s first leading role.

Ward Bond in John Ford’s “The Searchers”

Reverend Captain Samuel Johnson Clayton, in the eye of multiple storms, sure am fond of those donuts.

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Bond died on November 5, 1960, from a massive heart attack; he was 57 at the time of his death . John Wayne gave the eulogy at his funeral. Bond’s will bequeathed to Wayne the shotgun with which Wayne had once accidentally shot Bond.